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Tuesday, December 06, 2022

Cyclones bring misery to two distant regions of the world

Cyclones bring misery to two distant regions of the world

GENEVA — Hurricane Ian wreaking havoc on Cuba and the southeastern United States, and Typhoon Noru, hitting the Philippines, shows the potential for tropical cyclones to inflict pain and misery in the context of climate change, I this Thursday 29 World I review the Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Cyril Honoré, director of disaster risk reduction at the WMO, observed that “over the span of two weeks we have seen persistently powerful tropical cyclones with destructive winds, extreme rainfall and flooding in densely populated parts of the world.”

“The human and socioeconomic impacts of these cyclones will be felt for years,” lamented Honoré, the organization’s director of public services.

Ian struck Cuba as a Category Three hurricane on September 27, packing sustained winds of 125 mph and even severe thunderstorms that caused flash floods and mudslides.

Two people died, property and work of three million people were affected – in agriculture, housing and telecommunications – and the entire island was left without electricity for 24 hours.

The most affected is the western province of Pinar del Río, home to 75% of the country’s tobacco production, a major export to Cuba, and about 40% of bean production.

“Climatology is increasingly able to show that the extreme weather events we are experiencing have become more likely and more intense due to human-induced climate change” – Petteri Talas.

Ian increased in range and intensity and entered the US Florida peninsula on Wednesday 28 with winds of up to 250 kph, rain caused flooding and physical damage that has yet to be determined, temporarily without power. leaving over two million. ,

On Thursday the 29th, it crossed the peninsula from the Gulf of Mexico to the Atlantic Ocean and was moving toward the coasts of another southeastern state, South Carolina.

Meanwhile, in the Eastern Hemisphere, Typhoon Noru, known as Carding in the Philippines, hit the northeast of the country as a “super typhoon” on September 25 and is the most populous in the archipelago with sustained winds of 195 km. The island crossed Luzon. per hour.

More than two million people live in the most affected areas and 430,000 have been directly affected. Norieu then proceeded in the direction of Vietnam.

The WMO noted that the two cyclones came on the heels of two disastrous predecessors.

Hurricane Fiona, with deadly flooding in the Caribbean – it lashed Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and the Turks and Caicos Islands – moved north and was the strongest of its kind to reach the Canadian coast.

For its part, in the Pacific, Typhoon Nanmadol struck Japan on September 19, causing two deaths, injuring 90, leaving 350,000 residents without power and forcing the evacuation of nine million people.

According to the WMO, climate change can be expected to increase the proportion of large tropical cyclones worldwide and increase the heavy rainfall associated with these events.

Meanwhile, rising sea levels and coastal development are also exacerbating the effects of coastal flooding.

The organization stresses that accurate early warning and coordinated early action prove critical in limiting casualties during extreme weather events such as hurricanes and typhoons.

WMO Secretary-General Petri Talas said: “Climatology is increasingly able to show that the extreme weather events we are experiencing have become more likely and more intense due to human-induced climate change.”

“Increasing action on early warning systems is more important than ever to build resilience to current and future climate risks in vulnerable communities,” Talas stressed.

AE/HM

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