Friday, March 1, 2024

More than half of the world’s population remains unprotected from trans fatty acids

Consuming trans fatty acids is associated with an increased risk of heart attacks and death. Currently, a total of 53 countries around the world have best practice policies to address industrially produced trans fatty acids (TFA) in foods, which…

Consuming trans fatty acids is associated with an increased risk of heart attacks and death. Currently, a total of 53 countries worldwide has best practice policies to address trans fatty acids (TFA) in food, helping improve the food environment for 3.7 billion people, or 46% of the world’s population, compared to 6% just five years ago.

Trans fatty acids are semisolid fat solids that come in two forms: industrially produced and of natural origin. Currently, there is no evidence that they have health benefits, however, there is daily consumption of foods rich in trans fats such as fried foods, cakes, and prepared foods, which contain a high in sugar, fat, and salt. “Trans fats have no known health benefits, but they have many health risks.” promotes the WHO director general, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

Accelerating efforts to achieve best practice policies in just eight countries with the greatest need would eliminate 90% of the global burden of iTFAs, representing a remarkable opportunity for a world without death due to these types of substances.

Five most advanced countries against the ITFAs

In this context, the WHO makes a distinctionInco countries for progress in eliminating trans fatty acids industrial production countries, such as Denmark, Lithuania, Poland, Saudi Arabia, and Thailand, which received the first certifications from this Agency by demonstrating that they have the best practices policies in place for the elimination of iTFA, supported by adequate monitoring and compliance systems.

“We are very happy that there are countries that have already introduced policies that ban or limit trans fats in foods. But introducing a policy is one thing; So Denmark, Lithuania, Poland, Saudi Arabia, and Thailand, “Lead the world in monitoring and enforcing their trans fat policies. We encourage other countries to follow suit” added the director general of WHO.

However, despite progress in eliminating iTFAs from foods worldwide, more than half of the world’s population remains unprotected from its harmful effects, putting them at potential risk for increased heart disease.

In addition, WHO seized the opportunity to spread a new goal revised for the virtual elimination of iTFAs worldwide by 2025, based on: best practice elimination policies approved by countries representing at least 90% of the total global burden of iTFAs; and other best practices are approved by countries representing at least 70% of the total load within the regions.

Eliminating it is a powerful way to prevent heart disease and high human and economic costs. of medical treatments and loss of productivity. WHO remains committed to supporting countries in their efforts and celebrating their achievements.

World Nation News Desk
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