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Monday, January 24, 2022

Omar Kelly: Dolphins’ commitment to running is part of team’s resurgence

Who doesn’t want to see dynamic offensive plays, jaw-dropping passes and massive runs?

Soccer fans crave that type of entertainment, plays that build up chunk yards and provide points and end-field celebrations.

But NFL teams can and do win games — even playoff matches — with a consistent diet of 4-yard runs.

Maybe even a 3-yard run if the third-down is executed faster.

Even though we are in a blissful era of football, pounding the ball, rock running still wins the game, especially in December and January, when the winter weather sometimes forced teams to change their style of play. goes.

Add those 4-yard runs and the defense is usually on smoke when the fourth quarter comes. This is why the number one priority of each defense is usually to stop the opposition’s run game.

When offensive balance is not present, defenders may roll behind their ears and hunt the quarterback. Miami made that mistake early on, and has been diligent about changing the team’s approach over the past few weeks.

Before Miami’s four-game winning streak began, only the Tom Brady-led Tampa Bay Buccaneers threw more passes than the Dolphins, which was insane considering the approach wasn’t working. Miami’s coaches openly acknowledged that the offense was too one-dimensional, and out of balance, and insisted that those two issues made it a nightmare from a play-calling standpoint.

The Dolphins have juiced run games over the past month, scoring 29.8 rush attempts per game, which is higher than the NFL average (26.3), and 10 more carries per game than what the Dolphins said in the past month.

And even as the team’s yards-per-carry average isn’t impressive (3.4, which is second to last), the commitment to the ground game has been consistent, and Miami raked in their second straight 100-yard rushing performance. Coming out.

,[Running the ball] Opens up the offense for us, keeps us out of passing situations,” said Jesse Davis, the Dolphins starting right.[Defenses] One has to play both sides of the ball and not just think about pass rushing.

That’s why the run game matters. They force opposing defenses to play a team honestly. This helps to create more favorable down-and-distance situations.

Of the 13 teams that average more than 115 runs per game, only Jacksonville (115.1) is not looking for a division title and/or playoff berth.

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The NFL averages 4.28 yards per carry and 112 rushing yards per game. There are 14 teams that average 4.3 yards per carry or better, and only three of those teams — the Lions, Jaguars and Eagles — have the record for losing in this week’s games.

“It’s a big deal on us to have an offensive lineman. It’s also a matter of pride,” said Davis when asked about setting up a quick attack. “We want to run the ball. We want to get the downs first. We want to transform our small yardage [plays],

Play the ball effectively and your team can own the possession time, and as a byproduct the defense may not have to chug their Gatorade before returning to the field after a short offensive possession.

The Dolphins rank second to last in the NFL in rushing yards per game (80.2), and yards per attempt (3.4). Only the Houston Texans are worse.

Miami ranks 23rd in rushing attempts per game, with an average of 23.8 attempts per game. But all of those averages have improved significantly in recent weeks, and the balance created has been the catalyst for that improvement.

Running isn’t sexy, but it’s a fundamental part of football.

And that’s apparently the foundation of the run-pass-option (RPO) offense, which the Dolphins use as their base.

,[Running] Allows you to control the time of capture, which we have done in the last month. We have been able to be efficient on the third down. We are doing well there. If you can get down a manageable third it makes your job as a passer a little easier,” said co-offensive coordinator George Godse, who serves as Miami’s offensive play-caller. “Everyone knows the ball is probably going to be thrown in third, especially at a distance. Being able to beat Rush with a throw and still be able to get first-down yardage is very important.

“To get that manageable throw, you need to have positive plays on the first and second down running. They don’t always need to be chunky [runs], For us to stay ahead from the bottom and the distance has really been golden. ,

World Nation News Deskhttps://www.worldnationnews.com
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