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Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Supreme Court strikes down New York gun law in major ruling

The Supreme Court on Thursday overturned New York’s restrictive gun law in a landmark ruling on gun rights.

The judges’ 6-3 decision is expected to eventually allow more people to carry guns legally on the streets of the country’s largest cities, including New York, Los Angeles and Boston, among other places. About a quarter of the US population lives in states expected to be affected by this ruling, the first major gun ruling by the Supreme Court in more than a decade.

The decision comes amid active congressional work on gun laws following the recent mass shootings in Texas, New York and California.

Justice Clarence Thomas wrote for the majority that the Constitution protects “the right of the individual to carry a pistol for self-defense outside the home.”

In their decision, the judges struck down a New York law requiring people to demonstrate a special need to carry guns in order to obtain a license to carry guns in public. The judges said the requirement violated the Second Amendment right to “keep and bear arms”.

California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Rhode Island have similar laws that are likely to be challenged as a result of the ruling. The Biden administration urged judges to uphold New York law.

Supporters of the New York law argued that its repeal would eventually lead to more guns on the streets and higher rates of violent crime. The decision comes at a time when gun violence, already on the rise during the coronavirus pandemic, has flared up again.

In most countries, gun owners have no problem carrying guns legally in public. But this was more difficult to do in New York and several states with similar laws. New York City law, in effect since 1913, states that in order to carry a concealed handgun in public, a person applying for a license must show “good cause”, that is, a specific need to carry a weapon.

The state issues unlimited licenses, which allow a person to carry their weapon anywhere, and limited licenses, which allow a person to carry a weapon, but only for certain purposes, such as hunting and target shooting, or to and from work.

The last time the Supreme Court made a major decision on guns was in 2010. In this decision and a 2008 ruling, the judges established a national right to keep weapons at home for self-defense purposes. This time, the question arose before the court about taking one out of the house.

The court has previously indicated that there are no problems with gun restrictions in “sensitive places”, including government buildings and schools. The same is said about the restriction of the carrying of weapons by criminals and the mentally ill.

The New York law has been challenged by the New York State Riflemen and Pistols Association, which claims to be the nation’s oldest gun defense organization, and two men seeking unlimited freedom to carry guns outside the home.

The court’s decision is somewhat inconsistent with public opinion. According to an extensive Associated Press VoteCast poll of the electorate, about half of voters in the 2020 presidential election said gun laws in the US should be stricter. Another third of said laws should be left as they are, and only about 1 in 10 of said gun laws should be less restrictive.

About 8 out of 10 Democratic voters said gun laws should be made stricter, according to VoteCast. Among Republican voters, roughly half said the laws should be left as they are, with the remaining half split into more or less strict ones.

This article is republished from – Voa News – Read the – original article.

World Nation News Desk
World Nation News Deskhttps://worldnationnews.com/
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